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Trail Cam Photos

Trail Cam Photos
We love to receive photos of our grant recipients' projects, especially when they feature the fish or wildlife benefitting from the work. Below is a series of trail cam photos captured at an HCTF-funded habitat restoration site in the Kootenays. What a fantastic variety of mammals using this trail!  First up, the mountain goats:  Elk: Deer: Moose: And now for the carnivores, starting with a couple of cougar shots: Bobcat: And a glimpse of a bear:    Do you have a great photo of BC's fish or wildlife? Enter our 2015 photo contest! First prize is a $500 VISA gift card. For full contest details, visit out photo contest page . 

New Docks at Poirier Lake

New Docks at Poirier Lake
Local residents have a new place to go fishing with the recent completion of the Poirier Lake docks in Otter Point’s William Simmons Memorial Community Park. The project involved installation of a boat launch dock and separate fishing dock. The boat launch dock is adjacent to a new parking area and trails providing access to Poirier Lake. The fishing dock is accessible via a new path connected to the park’s Panama Rail trail, about a 3-minute walk from either the boat launch parking lot or the Butler Road parking area, off Otter Point Road. The docks were installed as part of a Vancouver Island fishing infrastructure program, initiated by the Province of BC. The program was designed to encourage participation in angling through increased accessibility to fishing spots near urban centres. “The key to developing the next generation of anglers is to get young kids and families involved at an early age. Poirier Lake is stocked with a good density of catchable rainbow trout,” stated Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Minister Steve Thomson. “The new dock will provide kids with a great opportunity to catch a fish, hopefully getting them hooked on the sport for the rest...
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Salmon River Success

Salmon River Success
The Nature Trust of British Columbia has announced the purchase of 165 acres in the Salmon River estuary near Campbell River on Vancouver Island. This new acquisition is connected to conservation lands previously secured by The Nature Trust and its partners over the past four decades. “Like many Nature Trust projects, conservation of the Salmon River estuary has been years in the making,” said Dr. Jasper Lament, CEO of The Nature Trust of BC. “This business takes time and patience. We are very grateful to our conservation partners and to the many people who helped make this deal possible.” Major funding was provided by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation and the Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program. Additional support was provided by the Campbell River Salmon Foundation, Barnet Rifle Club, Steelhead Society of BC, Kingfishers Rod & Gun Club, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Totem Fly Fishers, Parksville-Qualicum Fish & Game Association, BC Federation of Fly Fishers, and individual donors from across BC. “The Salmon River project is the latest purchase of conservation land made possible through the contributions of the anglers, hunters, guide outfitters and trappers of BC,” said Brian Springinotic, CEO of the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation. “The securement of this...
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HCTF Takes a Look at the Kitimat River Cutthroat Trout Project

HCTF Takes a Look at the Kitimat River Cutthroat Trout Project
As part of our evaluation program to ensure HCTF funds are benefiting fish and wildlife conservation, HCTF staff regularly visit project leaders to get an in-depth look at their projects – both on paper (financials) and on the ground. In early June, HCTF staff biologist Lynne Bonner and financial officer Katelynn Sander travelled to Terrace to meet with Regional Fisheries Biologist Jeff Lough to learn about his project Kitimat River Cutthroat Trout Behavioral Assessments. The following is their account of the evaluation:   The Kitimat River drains a large coastal watershed and discharges into the head of Douglas Channel at the town of Kitimat . It is a high priority for coastal cutthroat trout because of impacts from multiple human activities in the watershed. It also supports a popular fishery for both local and visiting anglers and the angling effort is significant. Prior to this study, information on the coastal cutthroat population was limited and anecdotal. This project aimed to investigate the patterns and behavior of coastal cutthroat, in an effort to understand how best to keep the populations healthy and sustained. In a joint radio telemetry and genetic analyses study with the University of Northern BC (UNBC), key cutthroat...
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Fraser River Sturgeon Project Featured on CBC

Fraser River Sturgeon Project Featured on CBC
CBC put together some great coverage of an HCTF-funded project that is tracking sturgeon in the Lower Fraser River. Project leader Erin Stoddard, dubbed the “sturgeon surgeon”, implants acoustical tags in these giant, prehistoric fish so that scientists can learn more about their movements and spawning sites, and can use this information to suggest policy changes that will protect them. You can read the CBC article and watch the videos here :   The Lower Fraser White Sturgeon Telemetry Study is in its second year of funding from HCTF, and also receives in-kind support from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations and the Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society.