Schools Grow Connection with Nature

Schools Grow Connection with Nature
The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation (HCTF) has announced it will provide over $62,000 for 25 BC schools selected to participate in its Wild School program . The 3-year program provides teachers and students of K-8 schools with free resources, training and support for environmental learning, outdoor field experiences and connections to conservation work in their communities. Three schools within the Cariboo-Chilcotin School District#27 have been accepted into the Wild School program: Marie Sharpe Elementary, Horsefly Elementary and 100 Mile Elementary. Calvin Dubray, Principal at Marie Sharpe Elementary , says the school is looking forward to beginning the program next fall, especially since it will coincide with the start of their new Nature Kindergarten program. “Our staff and students are currently engaged in place-based education and we are seeing deeper, richer learning happening,” says Dubray. “We are excited about the additional opportunities and experiences the Wild School program will offer to enhance our outdoor learning initiatives.” The Wild School program evolved from the successful Science in Action program that began in 2006. Science in Action was a single year program focused on providing K-8 teachers and schools with resources to support hands-on, active learning through science. In 2012, Science in Action...
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Meet the 2015 Fisher Den Box Kits

Meet the 2015 Fisher Den Box Kits
We received the following video update on the Fisher Artificial Den Box Study from biologist Larry Davis. Davis and his team are trying to determine if female fishers will use human-constructed den boxes to raise their young, as there are very few of the fisher's natural denning sites left in some areas of their range. "Fisher require large diameter trees with heart-rot cavities for reproduction," says Davis. "These trees are rare in managed landscapes."   2015 was the third year of this HCTF-funded project, and Larry and his team continued monitoring the 56 installed den boxes to see if they were being used by fishers. “We have been successful in attracting fishers to 50% of the den boxes, with many of the structures used for resting during winter," reveals Davis. "We identified 45 fisher samples using hair snaggers located at the entrance to the den boxes. Of these, 14 were identified as being unique females, with 8 of them using the structures more than once, and 4 of them detected at 2 different den boxes.” During the 2015 reproductive season, two fisher females used artificial den boxes to give birth to and raise their young. The video features footage of...
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Kids Take Part in Moberly Lake Trout Conservation Efforts

Kids Take Part in Moberly Lake Trout Conservation Efforts
At  Moberly Lake last Tuesday, fifty elementary students (and HCTF Chair Ross Peck) helped government staff release 8,000 juvenile lake trout as part of an ongoing effort to rebuild a population that has come dangerously close to extinction. When the Province began the Moberly Lake rehabilitation program back in 2010, there were less than 400 trout in the lake. Their extreme drop in numbers was thought to be caused by a combination of overfishing and competition or predation from other fish species. Historically, Moberly Lake’s lake trout were an important part of the local First Nations fishery and a favourite of local anglers, but the lake has been closed to all trout fishing since 2002, and is closed to all fishing from September 15 to October 31 to protect lake trout during their spawning season.   Last Tuesday’s lake trout release was the third release of the rehabilitation program, for a total of 36,000 released fish. The Ministry is hopeful these releases will aid in re-establishing a stable lake trout population on Moberly Lake. Over the past four years, the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation has provided funding to the Ministry to evaluate the effectiveness of their lake trout recovery program. As well...
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PCAF Deadline May 16th, 2016

PCAF Deadline May 16th, 2016
It's time to submit your applications for PCAF funding! The Public Conservation Assistance Fund provides small grants to organizations and individuals who have a great idea for a conservation project, but need financial assistance to make it happen. Projects can include activities such as wetland restoration, reptile monitoring, bird banding, and bat box construction - there are all sorts of possibilities, so long as the project provides clear conservation benefits for BC fish and wildlife and has a strong volunteer component. Application instructions and forms are available here . Applications must be submitted to HCTF by 4:30PM on May 16, 2016 to be eligible for funding.    Since 1974, the Province of BC and the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation have provided approximately $150,000 in PCAF grants to help implement on-the-ground conservation work, with a particular focus on hands-on, community based and public awareness initiatives. More than 1000 such projects have been carried out under the program so far.    

HCTF Announces 2016-17 Approved Projects

  HCTF is pleased to announce that 119 BC conservation projects will receive HCTF Enhancement & Restoration grants in 2016-17. In aggregate, these grants represent close to a $6 Million investment in British Columbia's fish, wildlife and habitats.  You can view the complete  2016-17 HCTF Approved Project List here , or download one of the region-specific lists below. The lists describe the conservation projects taking place in each region, their approved grant amounts, and project leader contact information. Please note that some of our multi-region projects may also be taking place in your area: check back soon for the updated 2016-17 interactive project map. (Click on any of the photo thumbnails below to display a larger image)       Vancouver Island Project List     The Provincial Government received a grant to relocate elk to areas on Vancouver Island where they had been extirpated (click on photo for larger image). A pair of Western bluebirds return to their nestbox. The pair are being reintroduced to the Cowichan Valley by the Garry Oak Ecosystem Recovery Team.     The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation will provide over $100,000 for bat science and stewardship projects in BC.     Lower Mainland Project...
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