BC Fisher Habitat Website

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The BC Fisher Habitat Working Group has just launched a new website to assist BC forest licensees and their contractors to identify and retain important fisher habitat.  The site allows forest practitioners to download information and tools specific to their location and operational focus. The site includes: - spatial data that lets planning foresters identify habitats and retention targets for harvested areas - pictorial guides to help on-the-ground field crews identify trees and other habitats important to fishers, and - field guides to help operational staff retain fisher habitat in their day-to-day activities. The web site is also designed for use by trappers, First Nations, and other people who are interested in learning more about fisher conservation. Visit the BC Fisher Habitat Website The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation is proud to be a major funder of this extension project.   
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Bat Counters Wanted

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The BC Community Bat Program is seeking volunteers and bat colonies for the Annual Bat Count. This citizen-science initiative encourages residents to count bats at local roost sites. “Bat counts are a wonderful way for residents to get involved in collecting important scientific information” says biologist Mandy Kellner, coordinator of the BC Community Bat Program. “No special skills are needed, kids can be involved, and you can relax in a deck chair while counting.” This year the Annual Bat Count will collect baseline data on bat populations before the devastating White Nose Syndrome fungal disease affects bats in the province. “White Nose Syndrome is estimated to have killed more than six million bats since it was first discovered in eastern North America a decade ago,” says Kellner. “In March 2016, the disease was detected just east of Seattle. This has greatly increased our urgency to understand bat populations in BC. We need the public’s help to census local bat populations. The summer of 2017 may be our last year to obtain population estimates before White Nose Syndrome causes widespread declines in western North America.” Volunteers wait outside a known roost site, such as a bat-house, barn, bridge or attic, and...
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PCAF Application Deadline May 16th

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HCTF's  Public Conservation Assistance Fund  provides small grants for conservation projects involving volunteers. Projects can include on-the-ground activities such as wetland restoration, reptile monitoring, bird banding, and nest box construction - there are all sorts of possibilities, so long as the project provides clear conservation benefits for BC fish and wildlife and has a strong volunteer component. An application guide, instructions, and forms are available  here . Applications must be submitted to HCTF by 4:30PM on  May 16, 2017  to be eligible for funding.  Since 1974, the Province of BC and the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation have provided approximately $150,000 in PCAF grants to help implement on-the-ground conservation work, with a particular focus on hands-on, community based and public awareness initiatives. More than 1000 such projects have been carried out under the program so far.

HCTF 2017-18 Approved Project List

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A list of our 2017-18 Enhancement, Restoration and Land Stewardship grant recipients is now available. Click on the link below to download a copy of this list.  HCTF 2017-18 Approved Project List
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Bull River Bighorn Herd Helped by Land Purchase

Bull River Bighorn Herd Helped by Land Purchase
The Nature Trust of BC has just announced the successful acquisition of the Bull River Grassland Corridor property in the East Kootenays. Nature Trust CEO Jasper Lament said the 67 hectare property is an exciting addition to existing conservation lands in the lower Bull River: “Bighorn sheep use this property as part of their traditional winter range,” said Lament. “Because it is bounded on three sides by other conservation lands, it is a very strategically important acquisition.”‖ The securement of this property removes threats of disease transmission from domestic livestock to the Bull River bighorn sheep herd. It also protects winter range for elk and deer, and protects habitat for the provincially Redlisted American Badger. This project was completed with incredible support from the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, BC Conservation Foundation, Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program, and Environment and Climate Change Canada through the Natural Areas Conservation Program facilitated by the Nature Conservancy of Canada. The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation provided over $350,000 to the purchase of this property, and is also funding a project studying the health and movements of the Bull River bighorn herd. “The Bull River herd has partially recovered from a die-off in the 1980s, and...
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