Poop Gives the Scoop on Who's Roosting Where

Many thanks to the Habitat Acquisition Trust for providing this update on the Community Bat Project!    Victoria, BC – November 2, 2017. During annual bat counts, Habitat Acquisition Trust volunteers and Bat Habitat Stewards collect guano samples from beneath the bat roosts. That’s a polite way of saying, we collect bat poop. Not to whisk away to fertilize gardens and restoration sites, but in the name of citizen science. The guano collected gets sent off for genetic analysis, to determine the species of bats living at each roost. We can’t tell what bats are living in a colony when they whoosh out of their homes at night and we don’t want to disturb the bats by physically capturing them. So this provides a safe means of understanding who’s roosting where. This genetic analysis, coupled with listening devices that interpret bat calls called Echometers is allowing HAT to build a more comprehensive understanding of bat populations. On their own, Echometers are most useful for sites where there isn’t easy access to collect guano. Since the listening devices can pick up bats roosting in nearby trees, and since the device sometimes narrows the calls down to several different species. Some of the bat...
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RFP: Social Media Services


We are seeking an experienced contractor to create, monitor and assist with the management of HCTF's social media accounts. 

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HCTF-McCubbing Scholarship Winners Announced

The inaugural winners of the HCTF McCubbing Scholarships were announced today at the BC Institute of Technology (BCIT) in Burnaby, BC. Fish, Wildlife and Recreation Program students Jessie Chestnut and Erin Sowerby Greene and Ecological Restoration students Alecia Lannan and Ryan Lee were each awarded a $5000 scholarship to assist with the completion of their studies at BCIT . The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation (HCTF) created the scholarships in memory of Don McCubbing, a fisheries biologist who passed away in 2015. Don’s legacy of academic and professional achievements in fisheries biology and habitat restoration included many scientific publications and innovations in fisheries management. Don strongly believed in educating and training the next generation of fisheries biologists through practical field work and technical skills training. He volunteered time training students at BCIT, an institution he believed was a leader in teaching field biology, specifically the Fish, Wildlife and Recreation and Ecological Restoration programs, where students gained practical field experience in fisheries management and habitat restoration. For several years, Don also participated in HCTF’s Fisheries Technical Review Committee and brought a wealth of practical experience and science based decision making to the project review process. HCTF congratulates all of this year’s scholarship...
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HCTF is Hiring

HCTF is looking for a Conservation Grants Specialist to join our team.  The Conservation Grants Specialist is instrumental in administering our grants application process. They also participate in the grant and project evaluation process, manage our proposal-tracking database, and contribute to other technical assignments related to program delivery. For more details, please see our  Careers  webpage.

Explosive Start to Restoring Steelhead Passage on the Coquihalla River

     A huge chunk of rock and debris preventing summer steelhead from reaching their spawning grounds has been at least partially cleared, thanks to a partnership between government, engineers, and non-profits. A fallen railway support abutment from the historic Kettle Valley Railway had been blocking fish passage up Othello Falls on the Coquihalla River since 2014. Using low-velocity explosives, engineers have split the blockage into smaller pieces, which should be able to be washed downstream by fall and winter high-water events. HCTF provided funding for this project along with the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, who have a fantastic write-up of the project on their blog .